RESOURCES

Read about the manufacuring history of some of the items we source.

 

 PYREX

PYREX

Pyrex has become an icon in most American homes. Production began at Corning Glass Works with the development of temperature-resistant borosilicate glass for railroad lantern globes marketed in 1909. By 1915, Corning Glass Works developed Pyrex, born out of scientific discoveries in glass and the emerging science of home economics, shaped not only by designers and engineers in Corning, but also by women consumers around the country.  The unique properties of the glass made it unlike anything else on the market — it was able to withstand temperature changes, didn't discolor, didn't change the taste of food and didn't retain food smells after washing. Corning Glass Works produced more than 150 different patterns of bowls, casseroles, refrigerator dishes, and more in a host of shapes and sizes which collectors typically use and hold onto for their lifetime.

 COUROC OF MONTEREY

COUROC OF MONTEREY

The Couroc Company, founded in 1948 in Monterey, CA by Guthrie Courvoisier and Moira Wallace, a husband-and-wife team, produced beautiful and often whimsical black resin trays and glassware made by skilled artisans featuring simple designs, often made with inlaid seashells, coins, wood, and metal. Courvoisier ran Couroc a little like an art-commune, employing many skilled artisans. The Courvoisiers created a proprietary formula of phenolic resin that was durable enough to form into trays. This formula was extremely durable and resistant to alcohol and flame. The name Couroc was an amalgamation of 'Cour'voisier and 'rock' as in "hard-as-a-rock".

 BAUER POTTERY

BAUER POTTERY

Bauer Pottery, founded by John Andrew "Andy" Bauer, is one of the more, if not the most, collected of the California potters. Starting in Louisville, Kentucky and then flourishing in Los Angeles, California, Bauer Pottery Company created simple, yet beautiful ceramics from the late 1880s to the early 1960s. Inspired by the weather and lifestyles of Southern California, Bauer Pottery created many different lines for the home and garden. New styles in bright colors were introduced soon after the Depression, and these quickly became a success. Bauer Pottery was revived in 2000 by collector Janek Boniecki, introducing a new line, Bauer 2000, featuring pieces based on original shapes and colors from the 1930s and 1940s.